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Philip McAuliffe HeadshotPhil McAuliffe is an Associate with PMA’s Boston Team.  

Army Career 

Phil enlisted in 2009 as a nuclear, biological, and chemical specialist. After a few years in this role, he was accepted into the Army Aviation Flight program and went to flight school to become a helicopter pilot. He ended up flying the Blackhawk helicopter as a Chief Warrant Officer. Phil attended flight school in Alabama before eventually being stationed at Barnes Air Force Base in Massachusetts where there is a small Army aviation contingent. From there he was deployed to Iraq. Phil and his crew, which often consisted of two pilots, a crew chief, a flight medical, and a critical care nurse, were responsible for performing aeromedical evacuation of casualties on the battlefield. The crew would arrive at the point of injury, pick up the injured person, and begin performing life saving measures in the back of the aircraft until they were able to arrive at the next point of medical care. The goal was, from the moment they got the call, to pick up the patient and have them back to a hospital within an hour.  

Journey to PMA 

Phil had some experience working in the residential construction industry prior to his service, so when he transitioned back to civilian life, he decided to work at a local construction management firm to get acquainted with the commercial life science industry. Subsequently, Phil became aware of an opportunity at PMA through a referral by a friend.  

Transferrable Skills & Knowledge 

Phil believes there are many different factors that correlate from military experience to the construction industry, particularly the prevalence of fastmoving and often complex situations. In the service, Phil learned the importance of remaining flexible and adaptable, and that is a hugely useful tool at PMA.  

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